Basics of Android Phone-An Overview

The Android operating system has been developing fast since the release of Version 2.x (ranging from Eclair, Froyo to Gingerbread) for smartphones and Version 3 (Honeycomb) for tablets. It achieves another great milestone with the latest Version 4 (Ice Scream Sandwich or ICS), a universal system suitable for running on both smartphone and tablet devices.
If you’re using a smartphone running on the Android version 2.x, you will be familiar with the four hardware buttons—Back, Menu, Home and Search—to interact with the system. Borrowing the design built for the tablet, Google’s flagship smartphone Galaxy Nexus running on Android 4.0 now has no hardware buttons on the front, not even one. These hardware buttons turn virtual, leaving only two physical buttons—Volume and Power—on the left and right sides of the device.

Like the screenshot, the three buttons Back, Home and Recent Apps often appear on a home screen and the Menu button only shows up when an app needs it. When you playback a video, the default media app hides all these onscreen buttons and takes up the whole screen area for your video. A pretty good idea.

If you’ve just got a new Android device running on Version 4.0, these tips and tricks might be of help to you. Some relevant information on older versions of Android is added for ease of reference where applicable.

How to Access Notifications in Android

At the top of your screen, you will see notifications which report calendar events, alarms, incoming mails or other ongoing events. Swipe down from the top of the screen to reveal the list of notifications, then swipe up from the O-sign to hide it.

  • Depending on the notification type, you can swipe a notification sideway to dismiss it, or tap the X-sign to dismiss all from the list.
  • To access a notification, tap it and you’re taken to the related email, reminder, message or app. The notification then clears automatically from the list where applicable.

Note: When you slide down from the top of the screen, you can also see this Quick Settings icon.
Touching this icon is equivalent to running the Settings app.

How to Remotely Control Music On Your PC With Android

People are living in an increasingly interconnected world, with devices often offering cross-platform compatibility for convenient methods of control. If you have an Android smartphone or tablet, however, just how easy is it to remotely control music on your PC using this gadget?

There are a number of solutions available to tackle this tricky issue, but for the purposes of clarity and ease, here is a single option that harnesses the power of Winamp, which is among the most popular media players.

PC Configuration

To get the ball rolling you need to add the Winamp media player to your PC if you have not already done so. This popular piece of software is preferred by many because it is far more flexible and customisable than Microsoft’s standard Windows Media Player program.

Once Winamp is installed and you have synchronised it with the folders in which you keep all of your music files, you will need to download and install a plugin, namely the one which deals with remote control.

The RemoteControl plugin should be easy to find, although bear in mind that you may also need to update other elements of Windows in the process. This will include the .NET Framework 4 and Visual C++ 2010 from Microsoft if they are not already present.

You do not need to worry about downloading these separately as the plugin will contain them and add them as necessary.

When this process has completed, start up Winamp on your PC and check the settings on the RemoteControl plugin. This will allow you to find the local IP address of your PC, which is necessary for the next part of the installation, for which you will require your Android device.

Android Configuration

Head to the Google Play market (formerly the Android Market prior to a recent re-brand) and search for the RemoteControl for Winamp application, which as you might imagine is developed by the same team that made the PC equivalent.

At this point the set-up process becomes much less complicated because you just need to download and install the app, then launch it and head to the settings.

Under connection settings, you need to put in the local IP address that you found on your PC, before heading to the app’s Overview tab and clicking on ‘connect’ to synchronise it with Winamp on your computer.

Bear in mind that you will need to have both your PC and Android device connected to the same internal network, which means that your smartphone will need to be hooked up to your Wi-Fi router. You cannot, for example, use your Android handset to control Winamp over a 3G connection in this situation, because the internal IP address will be irrelevant.

Once the connection has been established, you should be able to search through your music tracks, control playback, shuffle your collection and even examine and create playlists.

Purposes

It is worth noting that this kind of set-up will essentially allow you to turn your Android smartphone into a remote control device that allows you to manipulate the playback of audio on your PC, not actually stream media direct to your phone for portable playback.

The music will be coming out of the speakers which are attached to your PC, so it is suitable to use if you are sitting across the other side of the room, or are indeed anywhere within range of your Wi-Fi network.

There are other services out there that will allow you to remotely control more aspects of your PC for the purpose of media playback. Winamp is not the only option, but this particular arrangement does make it especially easy to get everything working.

Even if you do not consider yourself to be particularly literate when it comes to technology, there should be plenty of instructions available with compatible apps in order to let you get the job done correctly. If you are looking to find iPhone SIM only check out the latest deals and see which apps support remote control of your PC or Mac from an Apple handset.

All that remains is for you to sit back with your Android smartphone and your PC and watch how the two technologies can meld despite their differences.

How do GOOGLE.COM earn money?

Today whenever you are trying to search for something, the first thing that comes to mind is ‘Google  it’. Google has provided Internet users with loads of valuable products and facilities. The most popular of these are the following.

  •     Google Search Engine
  •     Gmail
  •     Youtube
  •     Orkut
  •     Google Adsense
  •     Google Adwords
  •     Blogger
  •     Google Maps
  •     Google Earth
  •     Google News
  •     Google Analytics
  •     Android (operating system)

Now in this post I will try to open the close files of HOW actually google earns money.

1.      Advertising

Google.com makes most of its money from paid advertising. When you do a search on Google.com you’ll often see listings at the very top and on the right side. Google.com charges money for those listings. Every time someone clicks on those links, they company that is listed gets charged. The amount varies depending on the competition for that particular key phrase that was searched. Key phrases can be as low as five cents per click, whereas others can be ten dollars or more per click.

But Google doesn’t get to keep all of that money — it pays out a bunch each quarter to publishers that run Google’s AdSense ads on their sites or in their mobile apps. That’s called “traffic acquisition costs,” or TAC. Last quarter, TAC was about $2.2 billion, or 24% of total gross ad sales.

Specifically, Google says it paid out $1.8 billion last quarter to AdSense partners, and another $400 million to “certain distribution partners and others who direct traffic to our website.”

2.      No production cost
Google doesn’t sell any tangible product and that’s the beauty of their business. They sell something that doesn’t really exist. They really sell traffic. It mostly comes down to this: They get paid for sending traffic to other websites. That’s why Google seems to be everywhere now: They have to show substantial growth to their stakeholders and to do that they have to drive more and more traffic to provide more and more advertisement. That’s also the reason they’ll be jumping in the cell phone industry, so they can make a bit of money from all the web traffic that next generation cell phones are going to drive in the next couple of years.

Expect to see Google around more and more in the next couple of years…

3.      Google Adsense:
This is an advertising program which was started by Google where every one of Google users can make money online. Website owners and bloggers are the ones who gain the most from this program. It depends on the amount of traffic that your website or blog generates. Advertisers pay Google some amount of money, every time someone clicks on their link as it helps them to increase their various businesses. Google also pays website and blog owners some revenue for every click on their Ad sense which is present on your blog/website. Google keeps part of the revenue that they earn in the process and pay remaining amount to the publishers.

4.     Gmail:
 
When we sign in to our mail accounts on Gmail which is probably the most popular at this point in time, we are shown sponsored links on our accounts. And these links are always relevant to the keywords of the mails that we receive.

5.     Android:
Google makes money (and justifies giving away the OS) by licensing the Google Apps that come on most Android phones (but not all). Apps like Gmail, the Android Market, Google Search, and others come in something called GAPPS. The Market is really where Google is interested. Sure, the other GAPPS add value to the phone (hence why carriers license their inclusion on Android-powered phones), but Google is making money with every app sold through the Market. Even free apps make Google money. Developers have to pay to have an account to list their apps under. Even ad-sponsored apps are likely using Google Mobile Ads, so Google’s getting revenue from that source as well.

How to Hide Pictures & Videos on Android

Have you ever had to lend your Android phone to someone and then hoped that they didn’t look through your image gallery? Maybe they will find some private pictures that you don’t want them to see! Or how about those pictures of you flexing or posing in front of the mirror? That would be kind of embarrassing! There are so many reasons why someone might want to make their photos on their Android device private. Below I will show you the easiest way to hide photos & videos on your Android device:

Instructions:

1. Go the Android Market (AKA Play Store)

2. Search for the app “Hide Pictures in Vaulty” [Market Link]

3. Click install on this free app

4. Launch the Vaulty app

5. Set a password for the app

6. Enter a security question (in case you forget password!)

7. Tap the Gallery tab & open a folder

 8. Click on a picture that you want to hide

9. Click the hide button

10. Your picture will now be hidden and availabe in the “Vault”

11. That’s it! Now just launch the “Vaulty” app the next time you want to see the hidden photos.

Screen Capture Full Web Pages on your Mobile

Meet Web Screenshots, an online tool that will help you capture a full-length screenshot image of any “public” web page with a click.

While the tool will work across all screens, it is a more handy option for taking screen captures of web pages on mobile devices – phones and tablets – where you often don’t have the option to install extensions.

Alternatives for Android and iOS

In the case of iOS devices – the iPhones and the iPads – you can use the Home + Sleep buttons to capture screenshots but a limitation is that it will only capture the regions that are visible in the Safari browser. Web Screenshots will capture the entire web page.

There’s no standard shortcut* for capturing screenshots in Android devices and sometimes you have to root the phone just for a simple screen capture.

You can however download the free Dolphin Browser with the Screen Cut add-on on Android and you’ll then be able to screen capture pages directly in the web browser. This is recommended when you wish to screen capture web pages that require login – like a snapshot of your e-ticket or an online payment receipt.
 The Samsung Galaxy series of Android phones do provide a built-in shortcut for taking screenshots. Press and hold the “Back” button and then press the Home key – the screenshot will be saved in your Photo Gallery.

How to Remotely Control Music On Your PC With Android

People are living in an increasingly interconnected world, with devices often offering cross-platform compatibility for convenient methods of control. If you have an Android smartphone or tablet, however, just how easy is it to remotely control music on your PC using this gadget?

There are a number of solutions available to tackle this tricky issue, but for the purposes of clarity and ease, here is a single option that harnesses the power of Winamp, which is among the most popular media players.

PC Configuration

To get the ball rolling you need to add the Winamp media player to your PC if you have not already done so. This popular piece of software is preferred by many because it is far more flexible and customisable than Microsoft’s standard Windows Media Player program.

Once Winamp is installed and you have synchronised it with the folders in which you keep all of your music files, you will need to download and install a plugin, namely the one which deals with remote control.

The RemoteControl plugin should be easy to find, although bear in mind that you may also need to update other elements of Windows in the process. This will include the .NET Framework 4 and Visual C++ 2010 from Microsoft if they are not already present.

You do not need to worry about downloading these separately as the plugin will contain them and add them as necessary.

When this process has completed, start up Winamp on your PC and check the settings on the RemoteControl plugin. This will allow you to find the local IP address of your PC, which is necessary for the next part of the installation, for which you will require your Android device.

Android Configuration

Head to the Google Play market (formerly the Android Market prior to a recent re-brand) and search for the RemoteControl for Winamp application, which as you might imagine is developed by the same team that made the PC equivalent.

At this point the set-up process becomes much less complicated because you just need to download and install the app, then launch it and head to the settings.

Under connection settings, you need to put in the local IP address that you found on your PC, before heading to the app’s Overview tab and clicking on ‘connect’ to synchronise it with Winamp on your computer.

Bear in mind that you will need to have both your PC and Android device connected to the same internal network, which means that your smartphone will need to be hooked up to your Wi-Fi router. You cannot, for example, use your Android handset to control Winamp over a 3G connection in this situation, because the internal IP address will be irrelevant.

Once the connection has been established, you should be able to search through your music tracks, control playback, shuffle your collection and even examine and create playlists.

Purposes

It is worth noting that this kind of set-up will essentially allow you to turn your Android smartphone into a remote control device that allows you to manipulate the playback of audio on your PC, not actually stream media direct to your phone for portable playback.

The music will be coming out of the speakers which are attached to your PC, so it is suitable to use if you are sitting across the other side of the room, or are indeed anywhere within range of your Wi-Fi network.

There are other services out there that will allow you to remotely control more aspects of your PC for the purpose of media playback. Winamp is not the only option, but this particular arrangement does make it especially easy to get everything working.

Even if you do not consider yourself to be particularly literate when it comes to technology, there should be plenty of instructions available with compatible apps in order to let you get the job done correctly. If you are looking to find iPhone SIM only check out the latest deals and see which apps support remote control of your PC or Mac from an Apple handset.

All that remains is for you to sit back with your Android smartphone and your PC and watch how the two technologies can meld despite their differences.

Free Android App To Share File Via Bluetooth

Download free android app Androbex and start sharing files through bluetooth connectivity. Sends files only to other phones and computers and not android phones.

Reported not to work on some android devices like HTC Hero and Samsung Galaxy but you can try yourself.

Compatible With:

  •     Motorola: Cliq, Dext, Droid
  •     Acer: Liquid(A1)
  •     HTC: Dream G1, Hero, Magic, Tattoo
  •     LG: Eve GW620
  •     Samsung: i7500
  •     T-Mobile: G1
download links r below
link1           link2        link3

How to Install Non-Market, Third-party Apps on Android

In today’s lesson, we’ll show you how you can install non-market, third-party apps & APK files on your Android devices. As you already know, the official source for apps on your Droid devices is the Android Market or now known as Google Play . Google Play can be accessed online using a Web browser, or right from the Google Play app that Android devices come preloaded with. However, Google allows its’ users to get their apps from anywhere they want. That is the great thing about Google (as compared to Apple), they don’t restrict their users and they allow you to use other app stores.

Why would anyone want to load a non-market, third party app? If you look around the Web, you can find many sites offering Android apps.  The apps on such sites may or may not be in the official Google Play store.  Some Android app developers don’t publish their Android apps on Google Play for various reasons.  For example, one possible reason could be to avoid the cost of publishing apps via the Google store.  Another reason could be that the Android app doesn’t comply with Google rules for their Google Play market.
WARNING:
Be careful when installing apps from third-party sources.  Some apps can contain malware, so make sure you get apps from reliable sources.

Third-party App Sources:
Besides Google Play (formerly known as the Android Market), there are several other popular app markets available. Some of the well-known third-party app markets are Amazon App Store, AppBrain, GetJar, and SlideME–although by mentioning them, we are not necessarily guaranteeing that the apps on those sites are safe or will run on your device. For those of you with rooted devices, CyanogenMod is working on a third-party app store as well.

Allowing Third-party Apps:
As a safety precaution, all Android devices come with the option to install “non-market” apps disabled by default. If you want to allow the installation of non-market, third-party apps on your smartphone then you’ll have to follow the steps below to get your settings configured properly.

Step 1: Click the MENU button
Step 2: Go to SETTINGS
Step 3: Click on APPLICATIONS
Step 4: Make sure that “UNKNOWN SOURCES” is checked
Step 5: Read the warning message and acknowledge if you are OK to proceed with the changes

That’s it! Now you can go to one of the third-party app markets mentioned above and start downloading APK’s (which is what they call Android apps that are compressed into one file).

Installing Third-party Apps:

Step 1: Using the Web browser on your Android device, go to one of the third-party app markets mentioned above.
Step 2: Search for the apps you want.  Make sure you read the descriptions so you’ll know whether an app is compatible with your Android device.
Step 3: Download the app to your Droid.
Step 4: Open your file browser app (my personal favorite is ASTRO [Market Link]) and locate the APK (Android Package) file.
Step 5: Install the APK file.  This is usually the default action when you tap on the APK in your file browser.

So what do you think? Did this work for you? What has been your experience with installing non-market APK files? Do you have any suggestions or recommendations? Let us know in the comments below!

Enjoy 25 min free calling even without pc at worldwide

Enjoy 25 min free calling even without pc at worldwide

Now You Can Make 25 min Free Call In Worldwide

JUST GO TO

https://vyke.com/

Or

Mob users go to

https://mini.vyke.com/

then register your mobile number then you will receive two msgs to confirm your account.
After confirmation click on ‘vyke assit call’ then enter your number in 1st box in 2nd box put which number which number you want to call. Then you will receive a call in 1st box number when you attend this call then 2nd box number get a call.Now your call is connected
you can use it on mobile and pc