Auto End Tasks to Enable a Proper Shutdown

This reg file automatically ends tasks and timeouts that prevent programs from shutting down and clears the Paging File on Exit.

1. Copy the following (everything in the box) into notepad.


Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESYSTEMCurrentControlSetControlSession ManagerMemory Management]
“ClearPageFileAtShutdown”=dword:00000001

[HKEY_USERS.DEFAULTControl PanelDesktop]
“AutoEndTasks”=”1”

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESYSTEMCurrentControlSetControl]
“WaitToKillServiceTimeout”=”1000”

2. Save the file as shutdown.reg
3. Double click the file to import into your registry.

NOTE: If your anti-virus software warns you of a “malicious” script, this is normal if you have “Script Safe” or similar technology enabled.

ONE CLICK SHORTCUT FOR SHUTDOWN RESTART ,DISABLE SHUTDOWN

In Windows XP Normally it takes a hell lot of time just Shutting down Windows, you have to move your mouse to the Start Button, click on it, move it again over Shut Down, click, then move it over the necessary option and click, then move the cursor over the OK button and once again (you guessed it) click. This whole process can be shortened by creating shortcuts on the Desktop which will shut down Windows at the click of a button.  Just follow these steps.

Create a shortcut for Windows Shut-Down

1. Right click on the Desktop and select New Shortcut. Then in the command line box, type.
C:windowsrundll.exe user.exe,exitwindowsexec
This Shortcut on clicking will restart Windows immediately without any Warning. Now anytime you can shut-down your windows system by double click ing this shortcut.

Create a shortcut for Windows Restart

To create a Shortcut to Restarting Windows, just navigate to above mentioned step and the type the following in the command Line box :
c:windowsrundll.exe user.exe,exitwindows
You are done. This Shortcut on clicking will shut down Windows immediately without any Warning. Enjoy it, lol…..
Disable the Shut-Down option in Computer Shut Down dialogbox.
This is a funny trick you can play on that lamer that has a huge ego, in this section I teach you, how to disable the Shut Down option in the Shut Down Dialog Box. This trick involves editing the registry, so please make backups.

Now Just follow this steps.

1. Launch regedit.exe and go to :
HKEY_CURRENT_USERSoftwareMicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersionPoliciesExplorer

2. In the right pane look for the NoClose Key. If it is not already there then create it by right clicking in the right pane and selecting New >> String Value.(Name it NoCloseKey ) Now once you see the NoCloseKey in the right pane, right click on it and select Modify. Then Type 1 in the Value Data Box.

Note : Doing the above on a Win98 system disables the Shut Down option in the Shut Down Dialog Box. But on a Win95 machine if the value of NoCloseKey is set to 1 then click on the Start >> Shut Down button displays the following error message:

This operation has been cancelled due to restrictions in effect on this computer. Please contact your system administrator.

You can enable the shut down option by changing the value of NoCloseKey to 0 or simply deleting the particular entry i.e. deleting NoCloseKey.
Instead of performing the above difficult to remember process, simply save the following with an extension of .reg and add it’s contents to the registry by double clicking on it.
REGEDIT4
[HKEY_CURRENT_USERSoftwareMicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersionPoliciesExplorer]

“NoClose”=”1”

Command Prompt on Right-Click

Many computer users, specially the programmers, need to launch a command prompt window every once in a while to execute some dos/shell commands. The problem is, when a command prompt window launched, the default path is normally the system path or the user profile’s path. The users will then have to do all the “cd” commands to change the directories to the path he/she wants.

This trick shows you how to add an option called “Command Prompt” when you right-click on a folder in Windows. With this option, a Command Prompt Window will launch and its current directory will be the path to the folder you’ve selected.

Use this trick at your own risk.

Here’s what you’ll get:

The Solution
You can either edit your registry OR download the registry file and apply it on your computer.

Method I. Manually edit the registry:

  • Start > Run
  • Enter “regedit” and hit Enter
  • Expand to “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREClassesFoldershell”
  • Right-click on “shell” and select New > Key
  • Make sure a new key is created under “shell”. Change the name of this key to “Command Prompt”
  • Right-click on this new key “Command Prompt” and select New > Key
  • Change the name of this key to “command”
  • Here’s what we should have:
  • Double-click on the “(Default)” text on the right window to bring up the edit box
  • Enter this text into the Value Data field:
  • cmd.exe “%1”
  • Click OK and close the registry.
Method II. Download and apply the registry file:
  • Download this registry file Here
  • Unzip it to a temp folder, then double-click on the .reg file to add the registry data.

Turn ON/OFF Num Lock on Startup

Most of standard keyboards come with a small numeric keypad which identified by the numbers from 0 to 9. However, this numeric keypad is also served for some other functions such as “Page Up”, “Page Down”, “End”, “Home”, etc… depending on which mode of the “Num Lock” is being used. 
Many Windows users find this numeric keypad useful to type the numbers faster. But oopps… after hitting a several keys on the numeric keypad, you recognize the outcomes are not what you expected. Then you recognize the “Num Lock” mode is “OFF”, so you just need to switch it on, and… start over your typing! The bad news is, by default, Windows turns the Num Lock off; however, the good news is, you can configure Windows to turn this Num Lock ON so that whenever you mean “number”, you really get a number.
Read on, you’ll get the details how to set Windows to keep the Num Lock status “ON” as default. In fact, you will need to make a small change on your Windows Registry to turn the Num Lock ON everytime Windows starts up.
IMPORTANT This article will guide to some steps to modify your Windows Registry. Stop if you’re not familiar with the Windows Registry. Making a wrong change on the Windows Registry could cause critical problems to your computer.
Proceed at your own risks
This tip modifies the Windows Registry. So be aware and careful when following the steps. Damage the Windows Registry might damage your Windows.
  1. Open the “Registry Editor” (“Start” > “Run“, then type “regedit” and Enter).
  2. Expand to the following key:
    HKEY_CURRENT_USERControl PanelKeyboard
  3. Within the keyboard folder, you should have a string value named “InitialKeyboardIndicators” with a value of 0, 1, or 2.
  4. Double-click on this string value “InitialKeyboardIndicators” and edit the value to what you want. Below is the explaination of the values:
    0: Num Lock is turned OFF on startup
    1: Disable Num Lock
    2: Num Lock is turned ON on startup

How to make Windows XP genuine for free

Follow these steps :-

1. Go to Start menu and select run and type regedit
2. A similar screen would open like this

 3. Now go to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE and open SOFTWARE folder.

 4. Now click on MICROSOFT and under this section, click Windows NT.

 5. Under this folder open CurrentVersion.

6. Open WPAEvents and under this folder click on OOBETimer.
7. Now a box would appear and changes its 2nd value to FF
8. Again goto Start and open Run and type the following code.
      
       %systemroot%system32oobemsoobe.exe /a

9. A blue color screen would appear.
10. Choose the 2nd option Register with telephone.
11. Press Change product key.
12. Enter the following key and you’re done.

              JG28K-H9Q7X-BH6W4-3PDCQ-6XBFJ

Enabiling Cmd + Regedit When It’s Disabled By Admin / Group Policy

CMD:

Step 1:
Create a new shortcut
Step 2:
Add the following to the shortcut:

REG add HKCUSoftwarePoliciesMicrosoftWindowsSystem /v DisableCMD /t REG_DWORD /d 0 /f


Regedit:

Step 1:
Create shortcut
Step 2:
Add the following to the shortcut:

REG add HKCUSoftwareMicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersionPoliciesSystem /v DisableRegistryTools /t REG_DWORD /d 0 /f
Back register keys b4 u try this

Windows Registry Tutorial

The Registry is a database used to store settings and options for the 32 bit versions of Microsoft Windows including Windows 95, 98, ME and NT/2000. It contains information and settings for all the hardware, software, users, and preferences of the PC. Whenever a user makes changes to a Control Panel settings, or File Associations, System Policies, or installed software, the changes are reflected and stored in the Registry.
The physical files that make up the registry are stored differently depending on your version of Windows; under Windows 95 & 98 it is contained in two hidden files in your Windows directory, called USER.DAT and SYSTEM.DAT, for Windows Me there is an additional CLASSES.DAT file, while under Windows NT/2000 the files are contained seperately in the %SystemRoot%System32Config directory. You can not edit these files directly, you must use a tool commonly known as a “Registry Editor” to make any changes (using registry editors will be discussed later in the article).

The Structure of the Registry

The Registry has a hierarchal structure, although it looks complicated the structure is similar to the directory structure on your hard disk, with Regedit being similar to Windows Explorer.

Each main branch (denoted by a folder icon in the Registry Editor, see left) is called a Hive, and Hives contains Keys. Each key can contain other keys (sometimes referred to as sub-keys), as well as Values. The values contain the actual information stored in the Registry. There are three types of values; String, Binary, and DWORD – the use of these depends upon the context.

There are six main branches, each containing a specific portion of the information stored in the Registry. They are as follows:

  •  HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT – This branch contains all of your file association mappings to support the drag-and-drop feature, OLE information, Windows shortcuts, and core aspects of the Windows user interface.
  •  HKEY_CURRENT_USER – This branch links to the section of HKEY_USERS appropriate for the user currently logged onto the PC and contains information such as logon names, desktop settings, and Start menu settings.
  •  HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE – This branch contains computer specific information about the type of hardware, software, and other preferences on a given PC, this information is used for all users who log onto this computer.
  •  HKEY_USERS – This branch contains individual preferences for each user of the computer, each user is represented by a SID sub-key located under the main branch.
  •  HKEY_CURRENT_CONFIG – This branch links to the section of HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE appropriate for the current hardware configuration.
  •  HKEY_DYN_DATA – This branch points to the part of HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE, for use with the Plug-&-Play features of Windows, this section is dymanic and will change as devices are added and removed from the system.
Each registry value is stored as one of five main data types:
  •  REG_BINARY – This type stores the value as raw binary data. Most hardware component information is stored as binary data, and can be displayed in an editor in hexadecimal format.
  •  REG_DWORD – This type represents the data by a four byte number and is commonly used for boolean values, such as “0” is disabled and “1” is enabled. Additionally many parameters for device driver and services are this type, and can be displayed in REGEDT32 in binary, hexadecimal and decimal format, or in REGEDIT in hexadecimal and decimal format.
  •  REG_EXPAND_SZ – This type is an expandable data string that is string containing a variable to be replaced when called by an application. For example, for the following value, the string “%SystemRoot%” will replaced by the actual location of the directory containing the Windows NT system files. (This type is only available using an advanced registry editor such as REGEDT32)
  •  REG_MULTI_SZ – This type is a multiple string used to represent values that contain lists or multiple values, each entry is separated by a NULL character. (This type is only available using an advanced registry editor such as REGEDT32)
  •  REG_SZ – This type is a standard string, used to represent human readable text values.
Other data types not available through the standard registry editors include:
  •  REG_DWORD_LITTLE_ENDIAN – A 32-bit number in little-endian format.
  •  REG_DWORD_BIG_ENDIAN – A 32-bit number in big-endian format.
  •  REG_LINK – A Unicode symbolic link. Used internally; applications should not use this type.
  •  REG_NONE – No defined value type.
  •  REG_QWORD – A 64-bit number.
  •  REG_QWORD_LITTLE_ENDIAN – A 64-bit number in little-endian format.
  •  REG_RESOURCE_LIST – A device-driver resource list.
Editing the Registry
The Registry Editor (REGEDIT.EXE) is included with most version of Windows (although you won’t find it on the Start Menu) it enables you to view, search and edit the data within the Registry. There are several methods for starting the Registry Editor, the simplest is to click on the Start button, then select Run, and in the Open box type “regedit”, and if the Registry Editor is installed it should now open and look like the image below.

An alternative Registry Editor (REGEDT32.EXE) is available for use with Windows NT/2000, it includes some additional features not found in the standard version, including; the ability to view and modify security permissions, and being able to create and modify the extended string values REG_EXPAND_SZ & REG_MULTI_SZ.

Create a Shortcut to Regedit
 This can be done by simply right-clicking on a blank area of your desktop, selecting New, then Shortcut, then in the Command line box enter “regedit.exe” and click Next, enter a friendly name (e.g. ‘Registry Editor’) then click Finish and now you can double click on the new icon to launch the Registry Editor.

Using Regedit to modify your Registry

 Once you have started the Regedit you will notice that on the left side there is a tree with folders, and on the right the contents (values) of the currently selected folder.
Like Windows explorer, to expand a certain branch (see the structure of the registry section), click on the plus sign [+] to the left of any folder, or just double-click on the folder. To display the contents of a key (folder), just click the desired key, and look at the values listed on the right side. You can add a new key or value by selecting New from the Edit menu, or by right-clicking your mouse. And you can rename any value and almost any key with the same method used to rename files; right-click on an object and click rename, or click on it twice (slowly), or just press F2 on the keyboard. Lastly, you can delete a key or value by clicking on it, and pressing Delete on the keyboard, or by right-clicking on it, and choosing Delete.
Note: it is always a good idea to backup your registry before making any changes to it. It can be intimidating to a new user, and there is always the possibility of changing or deleting a critical setting causing you to have to reinstall the whole operating system. It’s much better to be safe than sorry!

Importing and Exporting Registry Settings

A great feature of the Registry Editor is it’s ability to import and export registry settings to a text file, this text file, identified by the .REG extension, can then be saved or shared with other people to easily modify local registry settings. You can see the layout of these text files by simply exporting a key to a file and opening it in Notepad, to do this using the Registry Editor select a key, then from the “Registry” menu choose “Export Registry File…”, choose a filename and save. If you open this file in notepad you will see a file similar to the example below:

REGEDIT4

 [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESYSTEMSetup]
 “SetupType”=dword:00000000
 “CmdLine”=”setup -newsetup”
 “SystemPrefix”=hex:c5,0b,00,00,00,40,36,02
The layout is quite simple, REGEDIT4 indicated the file type and version, [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESYSTEMSetup] indicated the key the values are from, “SetupType”=dword:00000000 are the values themselves the portion after the “=” will vary depending on the type of value they are; DWORD, String or Binary.

So by simply editing this file to make the changes you want, it can then be easily distributed and all that need to be done is to double-click, or choose “Import” from the Registry menu, for the settings to be added to the system Registry.

Deleting keys or values using a REG file

 It is also possible to delete keys and values using REG files. To delete a key start by using the same format as the the REG file above, but place a “-” symbol in front of the key name you want to delete. For example to delete the [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESYSTEMSetup] key the reg file would look like this:

REGEDIT4

 [-HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESYSTEMSetup]
The format used to delete individual values is similar, but instead of a minus sign in front of the whole key, place it after the equal sign of the value. For example, to delete the value “SetupType” the file would look like:
REGEDIT4

 [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESYSTEMSetup]
 “SetupType”=-

Use this feature with care, as deleting the wrong key or value could cause major problems within the registry, so remember to always make a backup first.

Regedit Command Line Options

 Regedit has a number of command line options to help automate it’s use in either batch files or from the command prompt. Listed below are some of the options, please note the some of the functions are operating system specific.
regedit.exe [options] [filename] [regpath]
[filename]     Import .reg file into the registry
/s [filename]     Silent import, i.e. hide confirmation box when importing files
/e [filename] [regpath]     Export the registry to [filename] starting at [regpath] e.g. regedit /e file.reg HKEY_USERS.DEFAULT
/L:system     Specify the location of the system.dat to use
/R:user     Specify the location of the user.dat to use
C [filename]     Compress (Windows 98)
/D [regpath]     Delete the specified key (Windows 98)

Maintaining the Registry

On Windows NT you can use either the “Last Known Good” option or RDISK to restore to registry to a stable working configuration.
How can I clean out old data from the Registry?
 Although it’s possible to manually go through the Registry and delete unwanted entries, Microsoft provides a tool to automate the process, the program is called RegClean. RegClean analyzes Windows Registry keys stored in a common location in the Windows Registry. It finds keys that contain erroneous values, it removes them from the Windows Registry after having recording those entries in the Undo.Reg file.

Windows Vista Login Hacks

Helen Keller said, “Security is mostly a superstition,” which might explain why computer security is such a profitable business. Indeed, security has been a major selling point for Windows Vista, despite the fact that some of its best security features are turned off by default.

 For example, a password—that teensy group of characters that none of us seems capable of committing to memory—is optional in Vista, yet you can’t share files on a network without one. Of course, once you create a password, you’re doomed to retype it each time you power on your PC. And thus begin the daily visits to the Welcome/log-in screen. Fortunately, there are a few things you can do to tweak this seemingly invariable interface, for convenience and greater system security.

 Note that all these hacks require administrator-level privileges.

Log In Automatically

Vista Log-In
 To keep your password intact yet skip the Welcome screen and have Vista log you in automatically each time you start up Windows, enter the User Accounts window—but not the one in the Control Panel. To get to the first of two advanced User Accounts tools in Vista, open the Start menu and in the search box type control userpasswords2 and hit Enter. Select your username from the list, turn off the Users must enter a username and password to use this computer option, and then click OK. When prompted, enter your password (twice) and click OK.

 Next, open the Power Options window in Control Panel. Click Change plan settings under the currently selected plan, and then click Change advanced power settings on the next page. Now, under the Additional settings branch, set the Require a password on wakeup option to No and click OK.

 The last step is to jump to the Personalization page in the Control Panel and then click Screen Saver. Here, turn off the On resume, display logon screen option, and click OK. With all these options disabled, you’ll get to your desktop more quickly and with less typing.

Hide the List of Users

What’s Your Name?
 Of course, if you want to use your password to actually protect your PC and its data, take a step to make the Welcome screen more secure. By default, Vista shows a list of all the user accounts on your PC to anyone sitting at your keyboard, but you can hide this list with a quick hack.

 Open the Start menu and in the search box type secpol.msc; press Enter to open the Local Security Policy editor. On the left, expand the branches to Local PoliciesSecurity Options. Then, on the right, double-click the Interactive logon: Do not display last user name option, select Enabled, and click OK.

 If you’re using the Home Basic/Premium edition of Vista and don’t have the secpol.msc file, don’t fret. Just open the Registry Editor and expand the branches to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftWindows
 CurrentVersionPoliciesSystem. Double-click the DontDisplayLastUsername value in the right-hand pane and type 1 into the value data field. If the value is not there, right-click an empty area of the right pane, select New and then DWORD (32-bit) Value, and then type DontDisplayLastUsername for the name of the new value. (It should, but doesn’t, go without saying that you should back up your Registry before making any changes to it: see go.pcmag.com/saferegedit for instructions on safely editing the Windows Registry.)

The Other User Accounts Windows
 The change takes effect right away; the next time you log out or boot your PC, you’ll need to type both your username and password to log in. Note that while this hack does indeed hide the user list from would-be intruders, anyone with an administrator-level account on the PC can still see a list of users by logging in and opening the User Accounts page in Control Panel.

Rotate Your Password

Keep Those Passwords Changing
 Want to make your PC even more secure? Think of your password as a target and keep it moving. If you’re using Vista Ultimate or Business, you can set up Windows to insist that you routinely change your password. (If you have Home Basic/Premium, you’ll need to rely on a somewhat less-sophisticated solution, such as an annoying reminder in your calendar.) Open the Start menu and in the search box type lusrmgr.msc; press Enter to open the Local Users and Groups window (the second of the advanced User Accounts tools). Open the Users folder and double-click your username. Turn off the Password never expires option, click OK, and then do the same for all the other accounts on your PC (if applicable). Close the Local Users and Groups window when you’re done.

 Next, go back to the Local Security Policy editor (secpol.msc) and expand the branches to Account PoliciesPassword Policy. On the right, double-click the Maximum password age entry, and choose a length of time before each of the passwords on your PC expires; 90 days seems reasonable.

Change the Welcome Screen Wallpaper

 Unless you’ve decided to log on automatically, you’ll undoubtedly be spending time with your PC’s Welcome screen, in which case you might as well gussy it up. In earlier versions of Windows, you could change the background wallpaper with a quick Registry change, but in Vista, a little more hacking is required.

 Open Windows Explorer and navigate to your Windowssystem32 folder. Right-click the imageres.dll file, select Properties, and choose the Security tab. Click the Advanced button, choose the Owner tab, and then click Edit. Now select Administrators in the list, and click OK in each of the four open windows. Then right-click imageres.dll again, select Properties, choose the Security tab, and click the Edit button. Choose Administrators in the list, place a check in the Allow column next to Full control, and then click OK, Yes, OK.

 Now that you’ve taken ownership of the file, make two copies of it right in the Windowssystem32 folder and name them imageres-new.dll and imageres-old.dll.

 Next, you’ll need to install XN Resource Editor, a free utility available at www.wilsonc.demon.co.uk/d10resourceeditor .htm. Open XN, select View | Options, and from the Choose which parser to use list, select XN Resource Editor internal resource parser. Click OK and then, from the File menu, select Open, find the imageres-new .dll file, and open it.

 On the left, you’ll see a tree you can use to navigate the various graphical and user-interface resources in the file; -expand the IMAGE branch and then open one of the numbered folders therein. Inside each numbered folder is a single entry representing a different resolution of the stock Welcome screen background image. Choose the one corresponding to your PC’s current display resolution (the dimensions are shown in the gray box once you select the entry); if you don’t know your current resolution, open the Personalization page in Control Panel and click Display Settings.

 You can edit the image right in XN -Resource Editor, but you’ll likely want to grab a photo from somewhere else. Any photo will do, provided it has exactly the same pixel dimensions as the one it’s replacing. If it’s too big, use your favorite image editor to shrink and crop it to size. Too small? Just pad it with black space. When you’re ready, copy your new image to the clipboard (Ctrl-C) and then return to XN and press Ctrl-V to paste it over the selected image. Save the file and close XN when you’re done.

 The last step is to replace the imageres .dll file with the one you’ve modified, but since it’s in use, Windows won’t let you touch it. To get around this, restart Windows. After the screen goes black, but just before you see the Windows boot screen, press the F8 key to display the Advanced Boot Options menu. (Restart again if you miss your chance.) Use the arrow keys to select Safe Mode with Command Prompt, and press Enter. When the Command Prompt window appears, click the window and type:

copy imageres-new.dll imageres.dll

 and answer Y to confirm that you want to replace the file. When you’re done, press Ctrl-Alt-Del, click the arrow next to the red button on the bottom right-hand side of the screen and select Restart. The next time you see the Welcome screen, it should look different, if not better.

Removing Shared Documents folder From My Computer

Open registry editor by going to Start then Run and entering regedit. Once in registry, navigate to key

 HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE SOFTWARE Microsoft Windows CurrentVersion Explorer My Computer NameSpace DelegateFolders

 You must see a sub-key named {59031a47-3f72-44a7-89c5-5595fe6b30ee}. If you delete this key, you have effectively removed the my shared documents folder.

Change Logon Wallpaper-Windows XP

Logon wallpaper is the wallpaper or image that windows xp shows on screen when windows logs on (before it asks for username & password) . It’s usually set to the image-logo of the brand(manufacturer) of our computer (e.g. in compaq laptops). Now we can set it to our own image or any other image(any bmp file) by following trick.

 Open Startmenu->Run type regedit and press ok to open registry editor.(shows a tree like structure of directories at left)

 In that hierarchical structure in left, navigate to registry entry
 HKEY_USERS.DEFAULTControl PanelDesktop

 In right side pane see a number of values placed in a table format. choose the value named Wallpaper from there and double click it. Now you see a box with value name as Wallpaper and value data as Path to the image file .There give the full path of the image(bmp file) which you want to set as logon wallpaper by deleting previous path and writing path to your bmp file e.g. C:WINDOWSlon.BMP (to set image lon.BMP file as log on wall paper).

 Also double click on WallpaperStyle and change it’s value to 2 to get a stretched wallpaper at logon.

 Put that bmp file in windows directory for better results.
 If that is a jpeg file, convert to bmp file by opening in Windows Image Viewer and save as bmp.