Hack Admin Password From User Mode

Disclaimer: Use this article for eductational purpose ONLY.

 Follow these steps:
 1. Open command prompt (Start->Run->cmd),
 2. Enter the following command, then press ENTER

 3. Enter the followin command, then press ENTER:
 compmgmt.msc
 This should open the computer management console.
 4. Go to local users & groups->users. Right click on any user and select “set password”.

 If you get a “access denied” do the following:

 start>run>cmd
 then use following commands
 1) net user test /add (this command will make test named user)
 2) net localgroup administrators test /add (this command will make test user as administrators rights)

 and use net user command to reset your admin. password

How to Remove Windows XP’s Messenger

Theoretically, you can get rid of it (as well as a few other things). Windows 2000 power users should already be familiar with this tweak.

 Fire up the Windows Explorer and navigate your way to the %SYSTEMROOT% INF folder. What the heck is that thingy with the percentage signs? It’s a variable. For most people, %SYSTEMROOT% is C:Windows. For others, it may be E:WinXP. Get it? Okay, on with the hack! In the INF folder, open sysoc.inf (but not before making a BACKUP copy first). Before your eyes glaze over, look for the line containing “msmsgs” in it. Near the end of that particular line, you’ll notice that the word “hide” is not so hidden. Go ahead and delete “hide” (so that the flanking commas are left sitting next to one another). Save the file and close it. Now, open the Add and Remove Programs applet in the Control Panel. Click the Add / Remove Windows Components icon. You should see “Windows Messenger” in that list. Remove the checkmark from its box, and you should be set. NOTE: there are other hidden system components in that sysoc.inf file, too. Remove “hide” and the subsequent programs at your own risk.

Change Text and Baloon Tip

Change Text and Baloon Tip Associated

With All Desktop Icons
You need to know the object’s class ID (CLSID), which uniquely identifies each system
object. The following table lists the CLSIDs for common desktop objects.
CLSIDs for desktop objects

Desktop object CLSID

My Computer {20D04FE0-3AEA-1069-A2D8-08002B30309D}
Recycle Bin {645FF040-5081-101B-9F08-00AA002F954E}
Microsoft Outlook {00020D75-0000-0000-C000-000000000046}
Internet Explorer {FBF23B42-E3F0-101B-8488-00AA003E56F8}
The Internet {3DC7A020-0ACD-11CF-A9BB-00AA004AE837}
My Network Places {208D2C60-3AEA-1069-A2D7-08002B30309D}
Briefcase {85BBD920-42A0-1069-A2E4-08002B30309D}
Dial-Up Networking {992CFFA0-F557-101A-88EC-00DD010CCC48}

Run the Registry Editor, go to HKEY_CLASSES_ROOTCLSID, a key that lets you change
characteristics of system objects, and highlight the CLSID whose name or balloon text you
want to change. For example, to change My Computer, highlight the subkey
HKEY_CLASSES_ROOTCLSID{20D04FE0-3AEA-1069-A2D8-08002B30309D}. Keep
in mind that HKEY_CLASSES_ROOTCLSID has many CLSIDs listed under it, so it might
take you a while to find the proper subkey.
Once you find the right subkey, if you want to edit the name of the object, open the Default
value and type in the text that you want to appear underneath the object. If you want to edit
the balloon text for the object, open the InfoTip value and type in the text that you want to
appear as balloon text. Once you’re done, exit the Registry and reboot.

Set the Search Screen to the Classic Look

When I first saw the default search pane in Windows XP, my instinct was to return it to its classic look; that puppy had to go. Of course, I later discovered that a doggie door is built into the applet. Click “Change preferences” then “Without an animated screen character.” If you’d rather give it a bare-bones “Windows 2000” look and feel, fire up your Registry editor and navigate to:

 HKEY_CURRENT_USER Software Microsoft Windows CurrentVersion Explorer CabinetState.

 You may need to create a new string value labeled “Use Search Asst” and set it to “no”.

Secrets Behind The Run Registry key

You can start or stop programs from executing at bootup by adding or deleting them
to/from the run Keys in the Registry. Windows loads programs to start in the
following order; Program listed in the Local Machine hive, then the Current User
hive, then theWin.ini Run= and Load = lines and then finally programs in your Start
Up folder.

To add or remove programs in the Registry.

Open RegEdit. .Go to the desired Key:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersionRun
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrsoftWindowsCurrentVersionRunServices
HKEY_CURRENT_USERSOFTWAREMicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersionRun
HKEY_CURRENT_USERSOFTWAREMicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersionRunServices

Add a new String Value and name it anything you like. For the value data, enter the
path and executable for the program you want to run.

By adding the value to the KEY_CURRENT_USER hive instead allows the program
to start only when that user is logged on.
If you add the value to the RunOnce key the program will run once and be removed from the key by Windows.

Change Icons of your Desktop Objects

Change Icons of your Desktop Objects(MyComputer, Recycle bin..)

Go to HKEY_CLASSES_ROOTCLSID, and

look for the CLSID subkey from the table above for the object whose icon you want to change.

Open the subkey and then the DefaultIcon subkey under that.

To change the icon for My Computer, open the subkey HKEY_CLASSES_ROOTCLSID{20D04FE0-3AEA-1069-A2D8-08002B30309D}DefaultIcon.

Change the Default value to the path of the icon that you want displayed.

Follow the same for changing the icons of ther items as well.

Exit the Registry.

You might have to reboot for the new settings to take effect.

If you aren’t able to change your icons still, then try editing the following: HKEY_CURRENT_USERSoftwareMicrosoft WindowsCurrentVersion
Explorer CLSID, and you will be in.

Add folders and files in Windows Vista

In Windows Vista, you can add folders to Favorite Links in the navigation pane so that you can open them from any folder window at any time. To do this, first open the folder that contains the subfolder you want to add. Then simply drag its icon from the original folder to where you want it in the navigation pane. You can also click Folders at the bottom of the pane and drag a folder from the folder list up into the Favorite Links section of the pane. Note: You can’t add individual files to Favorite Links, but you can add them to any folder in Favorite Links.

 Pictures folder in Windows

Auto End Tasks to Enable a Proper Shutdown

This reg file automatically ends tasks and timeouts that prevent programs from shutting down and clears the Paging File on Exit.

1. Copy the following (everything in the box) into notepad.

QUOTE
Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESYSTEMCurrentControlSetControlSession ManagerMemory Management]
“ClearPageFileAtShutdown”=dword:00000001

[HKEY_USERS.DEFAULTControl PanelDesktop]
“AutoEndTasks”=”1”

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESYSTEMCurrentControlSetControl]
“WaitToKillServiceTimeout”=”1000”

2. Save the file as shutdown.reg
3. Double click the file to import into your registry.

NOTE: If your anti-virus software warns you of a “malicious” script, this is normal if you have “Script Safe” or similar technology enabled.

Turn Off System Restore to Save Space

By default, Windows XP keeps a backup of system files in the System Volume Information folder. This can eat up valuable space on your hard drive. If you don’t want Windows to back up your system files:

• Open the Control Panel.
• Double-click on System.
• Click the System Restore tab.
• Check “Turn off System Restore on all drives”.
• Hit Apply.
• You may now delete the System Volume Information folder.

Warning! If you turn this off you will not be able to use Windows System Restore to restore your system in case of failure.